Editorial » Buffalo Check

  • Buffalo Check: A Versatile Collection

    Posted on by Ashley Pinchev

    Our newest collection, Buffalo Check, is incredibly versatile due to its oversized dimensions. The scarf itself is 33 inches wide by 78 inches in length and is our widest piece. All of our scarves are already designed to be longer than standard to accommodate additional methods for styling each piece. The extra width lends our Buffalo Check Collection to being both a scarf and a wrap! We've compiled style tips below to demonstrate the versatility and incredible style of these pieces.
    As a Scarf
    When wrapped around the neck, the extra width gives our Buffalo Check scarves a beautiful drape at the front. The 100% Merino wool weave is warm without being itchy. Ideal for Fall! 
    As a Wrap
    The Buffalo Check collection can also be worn draped over the shoulders. At 33" wide, there is plenty of fabric to keep you warm and toasty on a chilly day. 
    Do you know the history of the Buffalo Check pattern? Our collection is a modern take on the classic American pattern. The red and black Buffalo Plaid originally seen throughout the American West dating back to the 1800s actually hails from Clan McGregor in Scotland. Read our article on the full history to learn more!

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  • The History of Buffalo Check

    Posted on by Ashley Pinchev

    While many people think of Buffalo Plaid as a statement from the American West, its origins in fact hail from the Rob Roy tartan of Clan McGregor in Scotland. A descendent of the Scottish clan ultimately settled in Montana and brought with him the classic textile. This relative traded heavy woven blankets in the style of his family's infamous black and raid plaid tartan for buffalo pelts, giving way to the nickname "buffalo plaid."
    While we Americans refer to the pattern as plaid, the correct term is in fact tartan. It is said that the Cheyenne and Sioux warriors that traded with Jock McCluskey, the Scottish descendant in Montana, could not properly pronounce the Gaelic word pladger, meaning tartan, and instead referred to the textiles as plaid. The Indians were in awe of the deep red color in the original tartan and believed it to be dyed with the blood of McCluskey's prey and conquests. These American Indians wore this McGregor tartan in battle for protection and good luck. 

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